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Springtime Flowers In And Around Long Island, New York

Springtime Flowers In And Around Long Island, New York

Springtime flowers in and around Long Island in New York, as well as the surrounding states, is something that most people heavily anticipate. You don’t have to be a gardener to appreciate the presence of Cherry Trees in flower or a mass planting of yellow and white Daffodils.

It is the beginning of April and before any more time escapes us I am just going to jump right into the various flowering possibilities and how they can be a part of your landscapes life.

One of the earliest springtime flowering trees on Long Island would be the Akebone Pink Flowering Cherry Tree. This is the first of all the

Cherry Trees for Early Spring. Why wouldn't you have one?

Cherry Trees for Early Spring. Why wouldn't you have one?

Magnolia Stellata, Royal Star. It can be pruned to remain 6x4 or you can let it go natural to 20'+

Magnolia Stellata, Royal Star. It can be pruned to remain 6x4 or you can let it go natural to 20'+

Camellias come in so many colors and petal forms. These Are April Trist

Camellias come in so many colors and petal forms. These Are April Trist

Cherry Trees to shout out ‘spring is here’. Another favorite early flowering tree with a grand white display is the Royal Star Magnolia. There are other beautiful flowering trees for our spring awakening but these are the most obvious characters in our landscapes and gardens.

The Nursery Industry has developed new flowering evergreen that have proven hardy for our New York planting zone. For about 20 years this group of Northern Hardy Camellias have begun to give our Rhododendrons and Azaleas a major run for their flowers. I would go into all the different varieties but that isn’t really my focus here in this article. I will show you pictures and then you can call me if you have the courage to surround yourself with all that beauty. Other early flowering evergreens are represented by the Kalmia latifolia, commonly called Mountain-laurel and Japanese Pieris also know as Japanese Andromeda. The Laurel commonly flowers pink/white and the Andromeda flowers cream/white. Both plants when planted corectly with the proper developmental pruning can bring continued value to a property for many decades. There are other notable plant choices but I need to keep it simple. The final evergreen I want to bring notice to is a

Andromeda pieris in bloom. Can take sun or part shade, but likes lots of organic soil.

Andromeda pieris in bloom. Can take sun or part shade, but likes lots of organic soil.

Mountain Laurel Shrub, with some large trees to create the best part shade environment.

Mountain Laurel Shrub, with some large trees to create the best part shade environment.

Rhododendron that many have heard of but don’t necessarily have themselves, the PJM Rhododendron . There are so many possibilities when it comes to deciding on flowers for the early spring, but I say why get overwhelmed with too many choice. When this occurs, too often no action is taken.

I have given you a list of sure winners to choose from. Now you have the chance to be bold, make a phone call and get one to begin your adventure. You now have the opportunity to never again say “I WISH I HAD DONE IT SOONER.”

Become an active participant in your environments development and enjoy the pictures. Slow down for a moment every day and view the flowers and trees through their seasonal changes.

Peace for a Happy Passover and Happy Easter.

 

3 comments

  • Susanne says:

    I’m looking for landscaping classes on LOng Island- for the amateur gardener (Nassau County) ? Any suggestions ?
    THanks,
    Susanne

  • michaelplant says:

    Michael Rosenberg of Plant With Me, Inc. tutors and trains individuals who are interested in developing landscape design techniques, garden management skills and soil, plant and environmental conditioning for the landscape and ornamental garden. Anyone interested should call the office or email the company through the website. Good luck everyone and happy planting.

  • Susan Tito says:

    Hi Michael!

    I am studying ornamental garden design at the New York Botanical Garden. Eventually I would like to relocate to the North Fork and set up my own garden design business. I’m a few years away from realizing that goal, but I was wondering if you have a need for an assistant/intern to help out on your jobs (when I’m not in class), time permitting. I could get some invaluable on-the-job training and you would get another set of semi-skilled (at this point) hands to help out. Am looking for a mentor-type of relationship closer to home (I live in Smithtown). Hope to hear from you, Susan


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